how to stop beating yourself up over what you eat

how to stop beating yourself up over what you eat

Of course you want to stop beating yourself up over what you eat! It feels like an awful, constant obsession that holds you down. But for many, letting go of the relentless struggle with food guilt feels easier said than done. Especially if you are in a bigger body, lifetime encouragement by doctors or family to lose weight reinforces the idea that certain foods are "good" and others are "bad". My clients tell me this makes beating themselves up a deeply ingrained part of their mindset. Even though it hurts, it feels wrong to let it go: how else will they control themselves? thought experiment: is it healthy to feel deprived, guilty, ashamed and anxious around food? If you know that your...

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how to set boundaries around “diet talk”

how to set boundaries around “diet talk”

My mother and I sit at the same Thanksgiving table, each taking two slivers of pie and a brownie for dessert. We both want to enjoy this celebration like we imagined. Instead, we find ourselves needing to set boundaries around "diet talk". My aunt says of me, a 30 something straight-sized woman, "she can eat still eat what she wants and stay skinny." Meanwhile, my grandmother eyes my mother, a 60 something plus-sized woman, as if to say "don't over do it - that's enough!" It's a hurtful dynamic that's been at play for years. At our table, I get a clear warning to enjoy my thinness while it lasts. I'm encouraged to eat plenty, for the sake of it. Meanwhile, my mother endures not-so-subtle...

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how to feel better without using food

how to feel better without using food

This might surprise you, coming from a Registered Dietitian: you can go ahead and keep using food to feel better, if you want. In fact, emotional eating is an important part of a healthy relationship with food. Let me explain. A client of mine was a life-long, self identified emotional eater. She grew up being bullied for her size and was put on diets from a young age. She learned to eat in secret in order to help herself feel better. It worked to feel better, but over the years using food as coping tool left her feeling guilty and out of control. She convinced herself she couldn't be trusted around certain foods, like candy and chips. She lived stuck in a cycle of binges whenever she felt...

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how to stop dieting for good

how to stop dieting for good

Do you want to stop dieting for good? You're not alone. Looking back, my clients find a harsh truth: they've been dieting more than half their lives. you can let go of diet mindset, even after a lifetime of dieting Sometimes diets make you feel in control, but it never lasts long, does it? Mostly dieting leaves you feeling guilty and saddened by the question "why can't I just lose weight?" If you feel tired of wasting time, energy, and money on diets that leave you worse off than when you started, you can choose a different path: a better relationship with food. You can stop living through the exhausting on-again, off-again cycle you've been going through for years. This post will show you...

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how to be okay with your body

how to be okay with your body

If you could snap your fingers and make it so, what would you change about your body? The answer to this question is exactly how weight loss programs have marketed their service to you over the years: flatten your tummytone your thighs and arms...sounding familiar? Weight loss marketing creates the idea that your body is a problem (spoiler alert: it's not - you have a GOOD body) so that they can sell you a product or service. Worse? They sell you weight loss even though we have evidence from research that diets don't work. As of 2019, the weight loss industry was valued at $72 billion dollars. Our dieting culture is what made you not okay with your body in the first place. All in the hopes...

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